A Guide to Zamość

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When Jan Zamoyski  decided to build Zamość, he assumed that that mostly Roman Catholics would live here and that the Collegiate Church would be the only church in the town. However, he soon changed his mind and in 1585 issued a settlement charter to Armenians, in 1588 to Sephardi Jews and in1589 to Greeks. Soon an Armenian church, a synagogue and a Greek Orthodox church were built for the new settlers. In the 17th century churches and monastic complexes were erected for Basilian, Franciscan and Reformati monks and a convent for  St. Clare Sisters. Unfortunately, Zamość monks and nuns were not destined to stay in their new churches for too long since at the end of the 18th century monasteries and convents were closed down by Austrian invaders as a result of implementation of the so-called Josephine reform. Where there was a wooden Greek Orthodox church now there is the Church of St. Nicholas. The only thing which reminds residents about the Armenian church is a commemorative plaque on the “Renesans” hotel, erected at its site. The synagogue, which now performs a cultural function has been taken care of by the Foundation for Protection of Jewish Heritage. The former St. Clare Sisters’ convent now houses the School of Music and the former Knight Hospitallers’ church and monastery have been converted into flats.

At present there are four churches in the Old Town. The former Basilian, Franciscan and Reformati churches again serve religious purposes. The status of the Collegiate Church was raised to that of the Cathedral when the Zamojsko-Lubaczowska Diocese was established on 25 March 1992. 

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The project was co-financed by the EUROPEAN UNION - EUROPEAN REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT FUND under REGIONAL OPERATING PROGRAMME OF THE PROVINCE OF LUBELSKIE FOR 2007-2013© Zamość Town Office